I took a walk in the wooded dunes near Lake Michigan and saw these wildflowers: Dutchman’s breeches and trout lily.  This is the time of year to see these blooms.

wild flowers

wild flowers

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Sculptures by Mother Nature

January 13, 2014


sand people Nature is the best artist.  When ice balls on the beach are whipped by sand and wind, sculptures arise.  This could be a Mongolian army, or munchkins or Khengis Khan and his brother Don.  It happens sometimes. You never know what you might see on the beach in Grand Haven, Michigan.

Lake Superior

January 13, 2013


moose_633_600x450

I explored the rugged coast, clear tributary trout streams, and brooding power of Lake Superior as a child and have returned to this greatest of the Great Lakes from time to time. I have picked up agates in Grand Marais and visited waterfalls on the Keweenaw Peninsula. Some of the oldest rock on this planet is on the Keweenaw Peninsula and on Isle Royale where we, my husband and I, hiked through thimbleberries higher than our heads and heard the bugling of moose, then saw one standing directly athwart the trail we followed. My husband smelled it before we saw it. And then there it was, a solid wall blocking our path. My husband has hunted since childhood and his sense of smell is acute. We thought we might see the elusive wolves, but people seldom do. On the map, Isle Royale looks like the eye in the wolf’s head shape of Lake Superior with Duluth its snout and the Keweenaw Peninsula its mouth.

August 14, 2012


Hiking Isle Royale is a great experience.

The Dynamic Great Lakes Blog

Greenstones, Wolves, Moose and Thimbleberries

On the map, Isle Royale looks like the eye in the wolf’s head shape of Lake Superior, with Duluth its snout and the Keweenaw Peninsula its mouth. It is precious since there are few places left on this planet that have been preserved like this. It is unique; some of the oldest rocks on this planet form Isle Royale, its plants and animals and minerals. There are copper mining pits on the Island where native Americans dug rich veins of copper long ago.

When I think of Isle Royale, I think of Eden, a place away from cars and the noise of machinery. There is no traffic on Isle Royale; only hiking trails. The sounds of Isle Royale are of bugling moose, the silvery songs of northern songbirds, the lapping of waves on rocks and the quavering voices of loons. Sometimes there is the slap…

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Greenstones, Wolves, Moose and
Thimbleberries

On the map, Isle Royale looks like the eye in the wolf’s head
shape of Lake Superior, with Duluth its snout and the Keweenaw Peninsula its
mouth. It is precious since there are few places left on this planet that have
been preserved like this. It is unique; some of the oldest rocks on this planet
form Isle Royale, its plants and animals and minerals. There are copper mining
pits on the Island where native Americans dug rich veins of copper long ago.

When I think of Isle Royale, I think of Eden, a place away from cars and
the noise of machinery. There is no traffic on Isle Royale; only hiking trails.
The sounds of Isle Royale are of bugling moose, the silvery songs of northern
songbirds, the lapping of waves on rocks and the quavering voices of loons.
Sometimes there is the slap of a beaver’s tail. The resident pack of wolves is
elusive and seldom seen. We did not hear them at all.

My husband and I
hiked the trails there and I’ll never forget the thimbleberries higher than our
heads along a trail. We picked the large berries like none other I have ever
tasted, copper color, tangy and delicious.

We found greenstones,
Michigan’s semi-precious stone. We stayed on Isle Royale for a week and every
day we took a different hiking trail. We watched a diving duck teaching her
young to dive. We saw a fox near its den, and had a close encounter with a
moose. As we hiked, my husband Norm said, “I smell a moose.” I didn’t believe
him, but as we came around the bend, there it was, bigger than life, standing
athwart our trail. We kept a respectful distance and it casually strolled off.

We did not fish, but the rocks off of the island are the place where the
Isle Royale redfin lake trout spawn as they have for millennia. This is an
endemic species and its good to know it is still returning to Isle Royale every
year before returning to the depths of Lake Superior.

 

Lake Michigan salmon and trout

September 16, 2011


The river smells of fish and sometimes the small silvery alewives will jump out of the water when they are being pursued by Chinook salmon, coho salmon, brown trout or steelhead. It’s that time.

People have been catching salmon over twenty pounds this year and good size trout. They are being caught in the estuaries and tributaries to Lake Michigan.

Read more about fishing in the Great Lakes in The Dynamic Great Lakes available at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.

The Singing Sands

August 3, 2011



The sand on Lake Michigan has a high content of quartz that causes a high pitched sound when a toe is dragged across the wet sand. The little sprite pictured above is enjoying the beach immensely. Keep an eye on little ones at the beach. Keep a watch for rip current warnings. If a red flag is flying, no one should go in the water.


I will be at Barnes & Noble in Norton Shores, MI Saturday, July 23 at 11 a.m. to sign books and to chat about the Great Lakes.
In addition to my non-fiction book, The Dynamic Great Lakes I will have two more books on hand: The Wilderness Within and Sophia’s Lost and Found. I hope you will stop by.

Great Lakes Influences

June 7, 2011


I live on Lake Michigan and I have lived on Lake Huron. I have traveled to Lake Superior, Lake Erie and Lake Ontario where I watched a meteor shower while camping. All this freshwater has led me to write. I wrote a non fiction book, The Dynamic Great Lakes that is critically acclaimed. It shows how each lake has changed and changes. It is especially about what lies under water. These lakes are magnificent.

I have included many Great Lakes inspired poems in my books, The Wilderness Within and Sophia’s Lost and Found: Poems of Above and Below