Took a walk on the beach this morning and this is how it looked. Nature is the best artist sculpting fantastic shapes from ice and snow and the singing sands.img_0639-edited

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Ice on Lake Michigan

February 15, 2016


iceshelf

The ice on Lake Michigan is fascinating to see.  It changes from day to day and hour to hour, but beware.  What looks like solid ice may strand you or a dog on floating ice or plunge you into icy water.  Read more about the ever changing Great Lakes in my book, The Dynamic Great Lakes.  Available at Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble and many fine bookstores.

DGL

Sculptures by Mother Nature

January 13, 2014


sand people Nature is the best artist.  When ice balls on the beach are whipped by sand and wind, sculptures arise.  This could be a Mongolian army, or munchkins or Khengis Khan and his brother Don.  It happens sometimes. You never know what you might see on the beach in Grand Haven, Michigan.


Image

The Lake Michigan lakeshore is starting to freeze and there is lots of snow in West Michigan. The whitefish are running but the Grand Heven pier where fishermen like to catch them is treacherous with ice. A fisherman slipped into the water recently and his body washed up on shore north of the pier. There is a railing along the Grand River approaching the pier where it is safer to stand. It is not necessary to venture out so far on the pier. Please be careful.

Read about how ice forms on the Great Lakes in my book, The Dynamic Great Lakes available from Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble and many other bookstores such as Powells, Schulers Books and Music and the Bookman in Grand Haven, Mi as well as Hostetters. The local museum also has a few copies.

http://books.google.com/books?id=CY7hAAAAMAAJ&q=the+dynamic+great+lakes&dq=the+dynamic+great+lakes&hl=en&sa=X&ei=_LKfUpTEDOemygHkw4HIDQ&ved=0CEMQ6AEwAA


The Dynamic Great Lakes

 

Review of The Dynamic Great Lakes

U.S. Water News – Peter Wild
Are dinosaurs cruising the benthic depths of the Great Lakes even while we go about our daily tasks? Not exactly. Yet sturgeon, fish weighing up to 300 pounds and similarly plated with armor,are nosing around down there. Occasionally you can see the monsters appear, making their spawning runs up rivers and surfacing like submarines in the pools beneath waterfalls.

The five Great Lakes, holding nearly twenty percent of the earth’s fresh water, are quite young. Gouged out by glaciers, they assumed their present shapes a mere 3,000 years ago. For that, they are a dynamic shifting system, still changing and exhibiting surprising differences. Lake Ontario, for example, the easternmost, although smallest of the bodies, holds more water than Lake Erie, its shallower nearby sister. Here’s a handy primer for all such things, from the interaction of phytoplankton and calcium carbonate that gives a white cast to these inland oceans come August and helps clean the water to the charming ice volcanoes spouting chilly “lava” in the winter.
This is intriguing stuff for adults, but the straightforward presentation also lends itself to use in schools, beginning about the sixth grade and up. And yes, we get the latest news on the zebra mussel, the tube nose goby, and other threats to the natural scheme of things. Also good news; how since the banning of DDT in the 1970’s, the bald eagles have come back.

Maybe the Manitous

December 16, 2011


The Wilderness Within by Barbara Spring

It’s getting colder now on the Great Lakes. The water looks heavy, dense, and usually by Thanksgiving, the first ice begins to form on the shore. First one crystal grabs a grain of sand and then it begins and a stiff collar of ice forms along the shore on the eastern side of Lake Michigan. Maybe the Manitous is a poem from my book, The Wilderness Within.

Maybe the Manitous

Eastward rolling water
pellucid dense and slow
Karo syrup gloss or
flowing molten glass.
One crystal grabs
one grain of sand and
the beach blooms
with frost flowers—
a stiff white collar grows
all along the sandy shore.
Cold.
Icy winds blast.
Ice balls bob, wink, crash.
An eagle’s cry hangs
midair
above a white horizon line—
when sweetwater seas
freeze.
Late afternoon sun—
deep blue shadows on snow
manitous whisper to ice shelves
sibilant spirits speak —
murmur to structures below.
From Milwaukee to Muskegon
cold rollers flow, then splash through
ice volcanoes on the shore
troll caves and canon balls
shot from polar storms
or maybe the manitous.

Maybe the Manitous

October 28, 2011


The Wilderness Within by Barbara Spring

It’s getting colder now on the Great Lakes. The water looks heavy, dense, and usually by Thanksgiving, the first ice begins to form on the shore. First one crystal grabs a grain of sand and then it begins and a stiff collar of ice forms along the shore on the eastern side of Lake Michigan. Maybe the Manitous is a poem from my book, The Wilderness Within.

Maybe the Manitous

Eastward rolling water
pellucid dense and slow
Karo syrup gloss or
flowing molten glass.
One crystal grabs
one grain of sand and
the beach blooms
with frost flowers—
a stiff white collar grows
all along the sandy shore.
Cold.
Icy winds blast.
Ice balls bob, wink, crash.
An eagle’s cry hangs
midair
above a white horizon line—
when sweetwater seas
freeze.
Late afternoon sun—
deep blue shadows on snow
manitous whisper to ice shelves
sibilant spirits speak —
murmur to structures below.
From Milwaukee to Muskegon
cold rollers flow, then splash through
ice volcanoes on the shore
troll caves and canon balls
shot from polar storms
or maybe the manitous.