Since DDT and like pesticides were banned in 1972, the American Bald Eagles may be seen around the Great Lakes.

Read About how this happened in my book, The Dynamic Great Lakes. 

Find the book at bn.com, Amazon.com and many other brick and mortar bookstores such as the Bookman in Grand Haven, MI.


The Dynamic Great Lakes Blog

We just saw an American Bald Eagle flying over Lake Michigan and it’s always a thrill to see this.

Years ago there were practically no eagles around the Great Lakes due to DDT. Their eggs would not hatch. After reading Rachel Carson’s book, Silent Spring, Norm Spring and I worked to ban DDT in our community and then the state. It took a long time for DDT to purge out of the Great Lakes system, but now we rejoice every time we see an eagle fly. This environmental success story was the inspiration for me to write The Dynamic Great Lakes.
It may be ordered from Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble and the book may be found in many independent bookstores.

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The Dynamic Great Lakes on Kindle    

click the link above

This critically acclaimed book is also available in paperback from many bookstores and online at Amazon.com, bn.com and many other places.

 

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Peregrine and Eagles Today

January 5, 2016


A peregrine falcon hovers

Over rolling Lake Michigan waves

Waves that carry something

the falcon is interested in

as it hangs steady in the wind.

 

On the sandy shore two eagles

Pick up carrion—dead white fish with silver fins.

It’s good to see a peregrine and eagles

Along the lakeshore today.

I thank my good man

For making it that way.

–Barbara Spring

Norm Spring won the Michigan Environmental Hall of Fame Award for his work in banning DDT and thereby bringing back the American Bald Eagle and the peregrine falcon to the shore of the Great Lakes.????????????????


The Dynamic Great Lakes

 

Review of The Dynamic Great Lakes

U.S. Water News – Peter Wild
Are dinosaurs cruising the benthic depths of the Great Lakes even while we go about our daily tasks? Not exactly. Yet sturgeon, fish weighing up to 300 pounds and similarly plated with armor,are nosing around down there. Occasionally you can see the monsters appear, making their spawning runs up rivers and surfacing like submarines in the pools beneath waterfalls.

The five Great Lakes, holding nearly twenty percent of the earth’s fresh water, are quite young. Gouged out by glaciers, they assumed their present shapes a mere 3,000 years ago. For that, they are a dynamic shifting system, still changing and exhibiting surprising differences. Lake Ontario, for example, the easternmost, although smallest of the bodies, holds more water than Lake Erie, its shallower nearby sister. Here’s a handy primer for all such things, from the interaction of phytoplankton and calcium carbonate that gives a white cast to these inland oceans come August and helps clean the water to the charming ice volcanoes spouting chilly “lava” in the winter.
This is intriguing stuff for adults, but the straightforward presentation also lends itself to use in schools, beginning about the sixth grade and up. And yes, we get the latest news on the zebra mussel, the tube nose goby, and other threats to the natural scheme of things. Also good news; how since the banning of DDT in the 1970’s, the bald eagles have come back.


Photo by Steve Damstra

photo by Steve Damstra

If we could experience the Great Lakes as an eagle or a fish we would feel the mighty air streams and currents in their waters. We would know the change of seasons: winter with its icy blasts, spring with the thawing of ice on the lakes, summer with the hatching of new life in nests, and autumn with the running of anadromous fish from lakes to river beds.

Life in and around the Great Lakes thrives when we take good care of the air and water. Our lives will thrive also with clean air and water.

Yesterday people picked up trash on the beach in Grand Haven Michigan coordinated by Alliance for the Great Lakes and a local business. Way to go!



Eagles will begin their courtship this month. The male and female play a daring game in the air. They fly high, grasp talons and plummet to earth unclasping at the last moment before hitting the ground and then they fly up.

Read about the environmental success story in my book, The Dynamic Great Lakes The success was that eagles made a comeback after Rachel Carson’s book, Silent Spring . The book made people realize what they must do to bring about good changes to the environment.


photo by Steve Damstra

The return of eagles to the shores of the Great Lakes is an environmental success story. Read more about what impact environmentalists had through the democratic process in The Dynamic Great Lakes now available through Barnes & Noble.


photo by Steve Damstra

The American bald eagle with a fish in its talons. Fish are the favorite food for eagles. These birds are protected and there are heavy fines for harming an eagle. They are an environmental indicator. Where you find eagles the environment is in good shape.


photo by Steve Damstra

This is an excerpt from my non fiction book The Dynamic Great Lakes
High above the sand dunes in West Michigan, a pair of American
bald eagles cavort; they dart, dive and swirl through the air at
dizzying heights. Suddenly one of them turns on its back and they
grasp talons spinning into a daring, cart wheeling free fall toward
earth. They unlock talons and flap their powerful wings, flying
upward at the last instant before hitting the ground. This, their
courtship ritual, will bond the two eagles together for life.
Today, bald eagles are seen around the Great Lakes more and
more often, but in 1978, these magnificent birds were threatened.
Threatened with extinction. Their eggs never hatched since
pesticides that lingered in the environment long after they were
sprayed to kill insects magnified in Great Lakes food pyramids. The
eagle is at the peak of the food pyramid and its favorite food is fish.
This makes the eagle an environmental indicator; a measuring stick
of how well the whole ecosystem is faring. Where the ecosystem is
healthy, eagles can live and raise their young
Since DDT was banned in 1972, the nesting eagle population has more than
tripled.